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Nicatou Outfitters

P.O. Box 452

Medway, Me. 04460

(207) 746-7211

All trips are completely outfitted and include all transportation, road use and camping fees if applicable.

Guided trips include all the above plus all meals.

Below prices are per person fees based on a 4 person adventure. For different group sizes, call or email us for current prices.

Self Guided 3 day - $280 5 day - $360 7 day - $510
Guided 3 day - $410 5 day - $620 7 day - $845

 

Baxter State Park

Mattawamkeag Wilderness Park

Katahdin Ironworks & Jo-Mary

Gulf Hagas

Scraggly Lake

Lobster Lake

Seboeis Lake


Useful Tips

Water Supplies - All water you will find naturally at camping spots in Maine is untreated and generally unprotected. Before drinking or cooking, it is strongly recommended that water be disinfected. This can be done a number of ways, such as boiling for a minimum of five minutes or the application of seven drops of iodine (from your first aid kit) per gallon of water. Bleach (Clorox) may be substituted for iodine. If you use a filter be sure pore size is 3 microns or smaller.

Firewood & Campfires - You are welcome to use dead and down wood for your fire at an authorized location. Extreme caution is always the rule. Remember a small fire is best for cooking and a DEAD fire is best when unattended. All outside fires must be within the steel fire rings provided at the authorized campsites. Building your own rock fireplaces is not permitted. By Maine law, it is illegal and punishable by a $50.00 fine to have an unauthorized cooking or warming fire, or for leaving any fire unattended.

Please do not steal signs or cut down trees along the trail. You are responsible not only for your own safety, but for the safety of others; be considerate of those who follow.


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Scraggly Lake

Scraggly Lake is the centerpiece of this area, which is located just northeast of Baxter State Park in northern Penobscot County. The Unit comprises 10,000 acres of gently rolling, heavily forested land, with numerous ponds, brooks and bogs. The lake has a campground, and 6 single sites all have picnic tables, Fireplaces and a privy.  Ireland Pond is close by and offers a more remote recreational experience. Camping is permitted outside of designated sites although fires are not. There are no camping fees for these sites and is first come first serve basis.

 Recreation- Fishing, camping, and hiking are popular activities. The lakeshore, combined with the well-forested uplands and the presence of a number of small marshes and wetlands, provide a diverse range of habitats that host more than 200 of Maine's indigenous species of wildlife. The lake and ponds offer excellent habitat for trout and salmon. This is a great place to hike and look at nature. There are 400-year-old hemlocks that are still standing.


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Lobster Lake

Lobster Lake offers a relaxed alternative to canoe tripping to different sites each night. This is one of the most spectacular lakes in Maine. Remote, loaded with wildlife and waterfowl. This Lake offers beautiful campsites, with sandy beaches. There are seven campsites and 2 group sites on Lobster Lake that are managed by the Department Of Conservation and is first come first serve basis. All campsites are equipped with picnic tables, fire pits, ridgepoles and privies. Camping is not permitted outside of designated sites.

Recreation- Camping, Canoeing Fishing and Hiking are the common recreational activities in this area.   


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Seboeis Lake

Seboeis Lake has 8 campsites all sites have picnic tables, Fireplaces and privies. Camping is permitted outside of designated sites although fires are not. There are no camping fees for these sites and is first come first serve basis.

Recreation- Campers and day visitors on this 13,000-acre parcel enjoy Canoeing, fishing for Salmon, Splake, Brook Trout, Small mouth Bass and Pickerel. There are impressive views of the nearby mountains as well as Bald Eagles, Waterfowl, Common Terns, Loons as well as moose and deer. A very nice place for Bird watchers.


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Baxter State Park 

Baxter State Park, a wilderness area of 202,064 acres, was a gift to the State of Maine by former Gov. Percival P. Baxter. In 1930 he made his first land purchase of 5,960 acres which included Katahdin, the highest mountain in Maine. This land was given to the State in 1931. By resolve of the Maine Legislature in 1933, the area was officially designated as Baxter State Park and the summit of Katahdin was named "Baxter Peak" in his honor. His final gift of 7,764 acres was made in 1962.

The Park is a paradise for the naturalist, mountain climber, hiker, and photographer. Many orchids, ferns, alpine and other plants grow in abundance. Geologists will find interest in Baxter's rhyolite, Katahdin granite and many fossil types. Bird watchers, wildlife enthusiasts and winter trackers will find a variety of wildlife to pursue. Gov. Baxter expressed the spirit of the Park. . .

Man is born to Die, His Works are Short-lived
Buildings Crumble, Monuments Decay, Wealth Vanishes
But Katahdin in All Its Glory
Forever Shall Remain the Mountain of the
People of Maine

There are 46 mountain peaks and ridges, 18 of which exceed an elevation of 3,000 feet, the highest being Baxter Peak at 5,267 feet. The park is intersected by about 175 miles of trails. The information contained in this brief introduction to the Park is not adequate for extended hiking or climbing. For your own safety, do not leave the Park Tote road without a detailed map o, the area to be traversed. Maps may be obtained at Campgrounds, Millinocket Headquarters, or the Visitor Center at Togue Pond.

Major Trails

Trail Route Miles
Appalachian Trail Park line to Katahdin Stream 4.95
Abol Trail Abol to Thoreau Spring 2.76
Hunt Trail Katahdin Stream to Baxter Peak 5.19
The Owl Trail Katahdin Stream to the Owl 3.00
O.J.I. Trail Perimeter road to O.J.I 2.71
Sentinel Mt. Trail Kidney Pond to Sentinel Mt. 2.60
Doubletop Mt. Trail Nesowadnehunk to Kidney Pond 7.80
Marston Trail Slide Dam to North Brother 4.24
Webster Lake Trail Black Brook to Webster Lake 7.20
Freezeout Trail Webster Lake to Second Lake Matagamon 9.0
Freezeout Trail Second Lake Matagamon to Trout Brook Farm 6.10
Trout Brook Mt. Trail Trout Brook Farm to Trout Brook Mt. 1.30
Horse Mt. Trail Perimeter road to Horse Mt. Tower 1.35
Fowler Pond Trail Perimeter road to Fowler Pond 2.00
Middle Fowler Trail So. Branch Pond to Middle Fowler Pond 4.10
So. Branch Falls Trail So. Branch Pond road to the falls 0.43
So. Branch Mt. Trail So. Branch Pond to Pogy Notch Trail via Black Cat. Mt. 4 06
North Traveler Trail So. Branch Pond to North Traveler 2.55
Center Ridge Trail Pogy Notch Trail to the Traveler 1.75
Pogy Notch Trail So. Branch Pond to the Traveler 9.61
Lookout Trail Russell Pond Campground to The Lookout Ledge 1.25
Grand Falls Trail Russell Pond to Grand Falls via Inscription Rock 2.75
Wassataquoik Lake Trail Russell Pond to Wassataquoik Lake 2.70
Wassataquoik Lake Trail Wassataquoik Lake to Nesowadnehunk Field 8.30
Russell Pond Trail Russell Pond to Roaring Brook 7.00
Howe (north) Peaks Trail Russell Pond to Hamlin Peak 6.85
Northwest Basin Trail Russell Pond to The Saddle 7.96
So. Turner Mt. Trail Roaring Brook to S. Turner Mt. via Sandy Stream Pond 2.00
Whidden Pond Trail Sandy Stream Pond to Whidden Pond 0.90
Helon Taylor Trail Roaring Brook to Pamola 3.16
Knife Edge Trail Pamola to Baxter Peak 1.10
Chimney Pond Trail Roaring Brook to Chimney Pond 3.30
Dudley Trail Chimney Pond to Pamola 1.25
Cathedral Trail Chimney Pond to Baxter Peak 1.70
Saddle Trail Chimney Pond to Baxter Peak 2.17
Hamlin Ridge Trail Chimney Pond to Hamlin Peak 1.95
North Basin Trail Chimney Pond Trail to No. Basin Ponds 1.25


To protect the wilderness resource, the park limits access to parking lots/trailheads. Access is based on a first-come, first-served basis when parking lots fill up, that area is closed. Early arrival is recommended for day-use.

Campgrounds

There are ten campgrounds located at Roaring Brook, Abol, Katahdin Stream, Nesowadnehunk, South Branch Pond Trout Brook Farm, Chimney Pond, Russell Pond, Daicey Pond (cabins only) and Kidney Pond (cabins only).

The campgrounds have facilities which may vary including lean-tos, tenting space, bunkhouses, fireplaces and picnic tables. Narrow roads prohibit travel with large trailers. Russell Pond and Chimney Pond can be reached only by foot trails. Canoes are available for rent at South Branch Pond, Russell Pond, Trout Brook Farm, Daicey Pond and Kidney Pond. Campers and visitors supply their own food and cooking utensils. Gasoline is not available in the Park, Although it is available at private campgrounds on the way to the Park. We strongly recommend checking your gas gauge before entering.


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Katahdin Ironworks & Jo-Mary

 

What is the KI Jo-Mary Forest?

Welcome to a unique area of North America - the KI Jo-Mary Multiple Use Management Forest. The private landowners cooperating in this program request that you read the following information. These guidelines are for your safety and will also provide for continued high quality forest resource management and recreational use planning. All rules and regulations are in effect from early May to November.

It is a region of approximately 175,000 acres of privately owned, commercial forest, located between Millinocket, Greenville and Brownville. Included within its boundaries are over 30 miles of the Appalachian Trail, the Gulf Hagas Reserve, the Hermitage, the east and west branches of the Pleasant River, White Brook, more than 50 lakes and ponds and over 100 miles of brooks, streams and rivers.

Much of this forestland was first purchased in the early part of the 19th century. Following the Missouri Compromise, both Maine and Massachusetts were land rich and dollar poor. In Maine, this wild, forested land was usually sold a township at a time. Even though prices were low, purchasing 36 square miles of land, sight unseen, was as much of a gamble then as it would be today. It was, therefore, not unusual for several investors to pool their resources to purchase the land. This type of joint ownership was (and still is) known as common, undivided interest and means each owner owns a percentage of each acre, rather than wholly owning certain acres, in the township. Costs of ownership and management activities were paid from gross income from timber sales. Profits were then divided among owners, according to their percentage of ownership. This unique ownership pattern persisted throughout most of Maine until very recently. The complications of modern tax and anti-trust laws have caused most forest landowners to trade their common, undivided interests for full title. Recent publicity regarding sales of vast forested tracts to developers has caused much public concern in the Northeast. In reality, ownership of most forestland simply changes to another forest landowner - sometimes through sale, but more often through trade.

It is an organization, KI Jo-Mary, Inc., a consortium of landowners, formed in 1986 to cooperatively address rapidly increasing public demand for recreation opportunities in the KI Jo-Mary Forest.

With the cessation of river drives and expansion of logging road networks, areas formerly accessible only by foot, wagon or water were opened to a greater portion of outdoors recreationists. At the same time, many Americans found themselves with more leisure time in which to enjoy the great outdoors. Conflicts between users became more prevalent. Outdoors people found “crowds" in their favorite, solitary places; the quality of the backwoods experience diminished. The KI Jo-Mary landowners recognized the need to provide better recreation facilities to accommodate the growing demand and to conserve the quality of the outdoor experience.

KI Jo-Mary, Inc. contracts with North Maine Woods, Inc., a professional forest recreation management company, to manage recreation in the KI Jo-Mary Forest. NMW’s extensive experience managing outdoor recreation in the working forests of Northern Maine fits well with KI Jo-Mary, Inc.’s management objectives. The KI Jo-Mary, Inc. Directors, who represents the landowners, set fees and policies regarding use of the area. North Maine Woods, Inc. implements these policies. User fees offset the costs of checkpoint operations and campsite development and maintenance.

It is a working forest, which makes it different from a wilderness area or a State Park. Recreational facilities are limited and you won’t see rangers, water or power hook-ups, gas stations, or tow trucks. All roads and bridges in the KI Jo-Mary Forest are maintained primarily for forest management activities. Trucks have the right of way - always. Watch for trucks and yield. Never block any road, even if it appears abandoned, and do not park within 150’ of bridges.

Timber is harvested here, as it has been for generations. It is transported over the privately built and maintained road network to markets that support the economies in communities throughout Maine. Several thousand Maine citizens grow, harvest, mill and process timber taken from the KI Jo-Mary Forest into products sold all over the world. Overall, forest based industries in Maine contribute 12% of employment, nearly $1 billion in payroll, and over $8 billion of the state’s economic activity. Hundreds of service industries support the forest products industry, providing additional economic contributions.

During the past century, softwood harvest supported timber needs during the times of river drives on the tributaries of the Pleasant River and Jo-Mary Lakes. Mountainsides around KI were cleared of hardwood to make charcoal to fuel the iron works. Yellow birch veneer was harvested during World War 11 to build airplanes undetectable by radar. Looking over the forest today, one can easily see that it is renewable. With special consideration for sensitive areas and application of advanced silvicultural techniques, the same forest will continue to provide the forest resources we often take for granted.

It is a spirit, past and present. Man and nature meet here. People, who make their living in the forest and those who come to relax, love this area for its rich history, its natural bounty, and its serene beauty. Landowners, both corporate and family, are working with Maine’s natural resource agencies, sporting camp owners, the Maine Appalachian Trail Club, North Maine Woods, Inc., and the users themselves to resolve current problems and plan for the future. Together, they take game, timber, and great pleasure from this region, yet the spirit of cooperation and mutual concern for the future assures it will not be any less tomorrow that it is today.

 

 

LAND USE FEES - PER PERSON - KI / JO-Mary / Gulf Hagas

For operating year 2003
May opening to October

 

Maine Residents

Non Residents

Under 15 or over 70 years of age

PER DAY

$4.00

$8.00

FREE

DAY USE SEASON REGISTRATION

$30.00

$50.00

 

ANNUAL CAMPING (OVER 70)

$30.00

$30.00

 

CAMPING PER NIGHT

$6.00

$6.00

 

CAMPING PER NIGHT (over 70) 

$3.00

$3.00

 

 PASSAGE AT ANY CHECKPOINT AFTER HOURS - $10.00/VEHICLE

CAMPSITES

Camping is allowed only in the more than 60 authorized campsites. Fees will vary according to the number in your party and the length of your stay. A fireplace, picnic table, and privy are located at each campsite. The sites are primitive and well spread out. You will find solitude, good fishing, good hunting, fresh air, clean water, good times, and many other outdoor activities as well. There is no running water or electricity. Campsites are maintained weekly. We ask that you carry out the refuse you carry in. Occasionally a campsite may be discontinued. Such closure allows the natural environment to recover from the impacts of frequent and concentrated activity.

No party will be allowed to camp more than two weeks in one location. No trailer, tent, or other equipment is to be stored on any campsite. Items left unattended for more than three consecutive days may be removed at the expense of the owner. Campsite reservations are not required, but recommended for Friday and Saturday nights. Requests should be made at least one month in advance. For the areas served by the KI and Hedgehog checkpoints, call the KI checkpoint at 207-965-8135. For areas served by the Jo-Mary and Henderson Brook checkpoints, call the Jo-Mary checkpoint at 207-723-8944.

Campsites in the KI Area

Name of Site # of Sites  Privies Tables Shelters
Silver Lake Field 10 2 10 0

Silver Lake 1

1

1

1

0

Silver Lake 2 and 3

2

1

2

0

Silver Lake 4 and 5

2

2

2

0

Pleasant River1

1

1

1

0

Pleasant River 2

1

1

1

0

Pleasant River 3

1

1

1

0

Pleasant River 4

1

1

1

0

Pleasant River 5

1

1

1

0

Pleasant River 6

1

1

1

0

High Bridge 1

1

1

1

0

High Bridge 2

1

1

1

0

High Bridge 3

1

1

1

0

Big White BK. 1,2,3, & 4

4

2

4

0

Hermitage Campsites

4

1

4

0

Hay Brook Campsites

3

2

3

0

Pine Camp

1

2

1

1

B Pond Road Site 1 1 0

Hedgehog Area

Long Pond 2 2 2 0
Silver lake 3 3 3 0

Jo-Mary Area

Gauntlet Falls 1 1 1 1 0

Gauntlet Falls 2

1

1

1

0

Crawford Pond

2

1

1

0

Long Pond

4

1

1

0

Big Pleasant Pond

2

2

4

0

Johnston Pond

5

1

2

0

Lit. Jo-Mary Pond

4

1

5

0

E. Br. Pleasant 1

1

1

4

0

E. Br. Pleasant 2

1

1

1

0

E. Br. Pleasant 3

1

1

1

0

E. Br. Pleasant 4

1

1

1

0

Overflow Site 5

2

0

2

0

Pratt Brook

1

1

1

0

Johnston Brook

1

1

1

0

B Pond Inlet

1

1

1

0

Ladds Campyard

1

0

1

0


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Gulf Hagas

The Gulf Hagas area is part of the Appalachian Trail corridor, which is federally owned and managed under the auspices of the National Park Service (NPS) and the Appalachian Trail Conference (ATC). Gulf Hagas is a primitive area and help for lost or injured hikers may be many hours and miles away. Inexperienced or ill-prepared hikers and families with young children should be cautious about tackling the Gulf Hagas Rim Trail, which is a difficult and often slippery hike. Consider stopping at the Hermitage, a beautiful old growth pine stand owned by the Nature Conservancy, or at Screw Auger Falls.

You can access Gulf Hagas from Hay Brook, where there is a small parking area. It is a short distance from the parking area to the West Branch of the Pleasant River. The river is about 150 feet wide at the trail crossing point. There is no bridge. In the summer; the current is usually mild and the water usually about knee deep (for an adult of average height). In the spring, and following heavy rains, the current is swifter and the water deeper. The Hermitage is about ˝ mile from the parking lot. Screw Auger Falls is about a mile beyond the Hermitage. The trail is moderately difficult.

Before you hike the Gulf Hagas Rim Trail, you should have a trail map, which can be purchased at the checkpoints, or a USGS topo sheet, and a compass. Sturdy footwear (not sandals or sneakers) appropriate seasonal clothing and an adequate supply of food and water are strongly recommended. From Screw Auger Falls, the Gulf Hagas Rim Trail is about 3 miles to the junction with the old Pleasant River Tote Road. This section of trail is considered difficult and rocks can be quite slippery. From the junction of the Rim Trail and the Tote Road, it’s about 2 miles of moderately difficult hiking along the Tote Road back to Screw Auger Falls.

The Maine Appalachian Trail Club (MATC) is a volunteer organization, dedicated to managing, protecting and maintaining the 267 miles of the trail from Grafton Notch to Mt. Katahdin. These volunteer citizens work hard to maintain the trails and signs in Gulf Hagas. Signs and trail markers may seem like tempting souvenirs, but theft and vandalism are illegal and rude. It spoils the natural beauty of the area and can result in other hikers losing their way - a serious threat to their personal safety. Search and rescue efforts are costly for Maine taxpayers and dangerous for the searcher.


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